PrimeZ270-p, Intel i7400 review and Debian – 1

This is going to be a biggish one as well.

This is a continuation from my last blog post .

Before diving into installation, I had been reading for quite a while Matthew Garett’s work. Thankfully most of his blog posts do get mirrored on planet.debian.org hence it is easy to get some idea as what needs to be done although have told him (I think even shared here) that he should somehow make his site more easily navigable. Trying to find posts on either ‘GPT’ and ‘UEFI’ and to have those posts in an ascending or descending way date-wise is not possible, at least I couldn’t find a way to do it as he doesn’t do it date-wise or something.

The closest I could come to is sing ‘$keyword’ site:https://mjg59.dreamwidth.org/ via a search-engine and go through the entries shared therein. This doesn’t mean I don’t value his contribution. It is in fact, the opposite. AFAIK he was one of the first people who drew the community’s attention when UEFI came in and only Microsoft Windows could be booted on them, nothing else.

I may be wrong but AFAIK he was the first one to talk about having a shim and was part of getting people to be part of the shim process.

While I’m sure Matthew’s understanding may have evolved significantly from what he had shared before, it was two specific blog posts that I had to re-read before trying to install MS-Windows and then Debian-GNU/Linux system on it. .

I went to a friend’s house who had windows 7 running at his end, I ran over there, used diskpart and did the change to GPT using Windows technet article.

I had to use/go the GPT way as I understood that MS-Windows takes all the four primary partitions for itself, leaving nothing for any other operating system to do/use .

I did the conversion to GPT and tried to have MS-Windows 10 as my current motherboard and all future motherboards from Intel Gen7/Gen8 onwards do not support anything less than Windows 10. I did see an unofficial patch floating on github somewhere but now have lost the reference to it. I had read some of the bug-reports of the repo. which seemed to suggest it was still a work in progress.

Now this is where it starts becoming a bit… let’s say interesting.

Now a friend/client of mine offered me a job to review MS-Windows 10, with his product keys of course. I was a bit hesitant as it had been a long time since I had worked with MS-Windows and didn’t know if I could do it or not, the other was a suspicion that I might like it too much. While I did review it, I found –

a. It it one heck of a bloatware – I had thought MS-Windows would have learned it by now but no, they still have to have to learn that adware and bloatware aren’t solutions. I still can’t get my head wrapped around as to how 4.1 GB of an MS-WIndows ISO gets extracted to 20 GB and still have to install shit-loads of third-party tools to actually get anything done. Just amazed (and not in good way.) .

Just to share as an example I still had to get something like Revo Uninstaller as MS-Windows even till date hasn’t learned to uninstall programs cleanly and needs a tool like that to clean the registry and other places to remove the titbits left along the way.

Edit/Update – It still doesn’t have Fall Creators Update which is still supposed to be another 4 GB+ iso which god only knows how much space that will take.

b. It’s still not gold – With all the hoopla around MS-Windows 10 that I had been hearing and seeing ads, I was under the impression that MS-Windows had turned gold i.e. it had a release like Debian would have ‘buster’ something around next year probably around or after 2019 Debconf is held. Windows 10 Microsoft would be released around July 2018, so it’s still a few months off.

c. I had read an insightful article few years ago by a Junior Microsoft employee sharing/emphasizing why MS cannot do GNU/Linux volunteer/bazaar type of development. To put in not so many words, it came down to the cultural differences the way two communities operate. While in GNU/Linux a one more patch, one more pull request will be encouraged, and it may be integrated in that point release or it can’t it would be in the next point release (unless it changes something much more core/fundamentally which needs more in-depth review) MS-Windows on the other hand, actively discourages that sort of behavior as it meant more time for integration and testing and from the sound of it MS still doesn’t do Continuous Integration (CI), regressive testing etc. as is common in many GNU/Linux common projects more and more.

I wish I could have shared the article but don’t have the link anymore. @Lazyweb, if you would be so kind so as to help find that article. The developer had shared some sort of ssh credentials or something to prove who he was which he later to remove (probably) because of the consequences to him for sharing that insight were not worth it, although the writings seemed to be valid.

There were many more quibbles but shared the above ones. For e.g. copying files from hdd to usb disks doesn’t tell how much time it takes, while in Debian I’ve come to see time taken for any operation as guaranteed.

Before starting on to the main issue, some info. before-hand although I don’t know how relevant or not that info. might be –

Prime Z270-P uses EFI 2.60 by American Megatrends –

/home/shirish> sudo dmesg | grep -i efi
[sudo] password for shirish:
[ 0.000000] efi: EFI v2.60 by American Megatrends

I can share more info. if needed later.

Now as I understood/interpretated info. found on the web and by experience Microsoft makes quite a few more partitions than necessary to get MS-Windows installed.

This is how it stacks up/shows up –

> sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/sda: 3.7 TiB, 4000787030016 bytes, 7814037168 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Device Start End Sectors Size Type
/dev/sda1 34 262177 262144 128M Microsoft reserved
/dev/sda2 264192 1185791 921600 450M Windows recovery environment
/dev/sda3 1185792 1390591 204800 100M EFI System
/dev/sda4 1390592 3718037503 3716646912 1.7T Microsoft basic data
/dev/sda5 3718037504 3718232063 194560 95M Linux filesystem
/dev/sda6 3718232064 5280731135 1562499072 745.1G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda7 5280731136 7761199103 2480467968 1.2T Linux filesystem
/dev/sda8 7761199104 7814035455 52836352 25.2G Linux swap

I had made 2 GB for /boot in MS-Windows installer as I had thought it would take only some space and leave the rest for Debian GNU/Linux’s /boot to put its kernel entries, tools to check memory and whatever else I wanted to have on /boot/debian but for some reason I have not yet understood, that didn’t work out as I expected it to be.

Device Start End Sectors Size Type
/dev/sda1 34 262177 262144 128M Microsoft reserved
/dev/sda2 264192 1185791 921600 450M Windows recovery environment
/dev/sda3 1185792 1390591 204800 100M EFI System
/dev/sda4 1390592 3718037503 3716646912 1.7T Microsoft basic data

As seen in the above, the first four primary partitions are taken by MS-Windows themselves. I just wish I had understood how to use GPT disklabels properly so I could figure out things better, but it seems (for reasons not fully understood) why the efi partition is a lowly 100 MB which I suspect where /boot is when I asked it to be 2 GB. Is that UEFI doing, Microsoft’s doing or something which is a default bit, dunno. Having the EFI partition smaller hampers the way I want to do things as will be clear in a short while from now.

After I installed MS-Windows, I installed Debian GNU/Linux using the net install method.

The following is what I had put on piece of paper as what partitions would be for GNU/Linux –

/boot – 512 MB (should be enough to accommodate couple of kernel versions, memory checking and any other tools I might need in the future.

/ – 700 GB – well admittedly that looks insane a bit but I do like to play with new programs/binaries as and when possible and don’t want to run out of space as and when I forget to clean it up.

[off-topic, wishlist] One tool I would like to have (and dunno if it’s there) is an ability to know when I installed a package, how many times I have used it, how frequently and the ability to add small notes or description to the package. Many a times I have seen that the package description is either too vague or doesn’t focus on the practical usefulness of a package to me .

An easy example to share what I mean would be the apt package –

aptitude show apt
Package: apt
Version: 1.6~alpha6
Essential: yes
State: installed
Automatically installed: no
Priority: required
Section: admin
Maintainer: APT Development Team
Architecture: amd64
Uncompressed Size: 3,840 k
Depends: adduser, gpgv | gpgv2 | gpgv1, debian-archive-keyring, libapt-pkg5.0 (>= 1.6~alpha6), libc6 (>= 2.15), libgcc1 (>= 1:3.0), libgnutls30 (>= 3.5.6), libseccomp2 (>=1.0.1), libstdc++6 (>= 5.2)
Recommends: ca-certificates
Suggests: apt-doc, aptitude | synaptic | wajig, dpkg-dev (>= 1.17.2), gnupg | gnupg2 | gnupg1, powermgmt-base, python-apt
Breaks: apt-transport-https (< 1.5~alpha4~), apt-utils (< 1.3~exp2~), aptitude (< 0.8.10)
Replaces: apt-transport-https (< 1.5~alpha4~), apt-utils (< 1.3~exp2~)
Provides: apt-transport-https (= 1.6~alpha6)
Description: commandline package manager
This package provides commandline tools for searching and managing as well as querying information about packages as a low-level access to all features of the libapt-pkg library.

These include:
* apt-get for retrieval of packages and information about them from authenticated sources and for installation, upgrade and removal of packages together with their dependencies
* apt-cache for querying available information about installed as well as installable packages
* apt-cdrom to use removable media as a source for packages
* apt-config as an interface to the configuration settings
* apt-key as an interface to manage authentication keys

Now while I love all the various tools that the apt package has, I do have special fondness for $apt-cache rdepends $package

as it gives another overview of a package or library or shared library that I may be interested in and which other packages are in its orbit.

Over period of time it becomes easy/easier to forget packages that you don’t use day-to-day hence having something like such a tool would be a god-send where you can put personal notes about packages. Another could be reminders of tickets posted upstream or something on those lines. I don’t know of any tool/package which does something on those lines. [/off-topic, wishlist]

/home – 1.2 TB

swap – 25.2 GB

Admit I got a bit overboard on swap space but as and when I get more memory at least should have swap 1:1 right. I am not sure if the old rules would still apply or not.

Then I used Debian buster alpha 2 netinstall iso

https://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/buster_di_alpha2/amd64/iso-cd/debian-buster-DI-alpha2-amd64-netinst.iso and put it on the usb stick. I did use the sha1sum to ensure that the netinstall iso was the same as the original one https://cdimage.debian.org/cdimage/buster_di_alpha2/amd64/iso-cd/SHA1SUMS

After that simply doing a dd if of was enough to copy the net install to the usb stick.

I did have some issues with the installation which I’ll share in the next post but the most critical issue was that I had to again do make a /boot and even though I made /boot as a separate partition and gave 1 GB to it during the partitioning step, I got only 100 MB and I have no idea why it is like that.

/dev/sda5 3718037504 3718232063 194560 95M Linux filesystem

> df -h /boot
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda5 88M 68M 14M 84% /boot

home/shirish> ls -lh /boot
total 55M
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 193K Dec 22 19:42 config-4.14.0-2-amd64
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 193K Jan 15 01:15 config-4.14.0-3-amd64
drwx------ 3 root root 1.0K Jan 1 1970 efi
drwxr-xr-x 5 root root 1.0K Jan 20 10:40 grub
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 19M Jan 17 10:40 initrd.img-4.14.0-2-amd64
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 21M Jan 20 10:40 initrd.img-4.14.0-3-amd64
drwx------ 2 root root 12K Jan 1 17:49 lost+found
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 2.9M Dec 22 19:42 System.map-4.14.0-2-amd64
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 2.9M Jan 15 01:15 System.map-4.14.0-3-amd64
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4.4M Dec 22 19:42 vmlinuz-4.14.0-2-amd64
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 4.7M Jan 15 01:15 vmlinuz-4.14.0-3-amd64

root@debian:/boot/efi/EFI# ls -lh
total 3.0K
drwx------ 2 root root 1.0K Dec 31 21:38 Boot
drwx------ 2 root root 1.0K Dec 31 19:23 debian
drwx------ 4 root root 1.0K Dec 31 21:32 Microsoft

I would be the first to say I don’t really the understand this EFI business.

The only thing I do understand that it’s good that even without OS it becomes easier to see that all the components if you change/add which would or would not work in BIOS. In bios, getting info on components were iffy at best.

There have been other issues with EFI which I may take in another blog post but for now I would be happy if somebody can share –

how to have a big /boot/ so it’s not a small partition for debian boot. I don’t see any value in having a bigger /boot for MS-Windows unless there is a way to also get grub2 pointer/header added in MS-Windows bootloader. Will share the reasons for it in the next blog post.

I am open to reinstalling both MS-Windows and Debian from scratch although that would happen when debian-buster-alpha3 arrives. Any answer to the above would give me something to try the solution and share if I get the desired result.

Looking forward for answers.

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